Wellington City Building Footprints

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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10111
12987
Updated
09 May 2012

Polygons representing building rooftop outlines for urban Wellington including Makara Beach and Makara Village. Each building has an associated elevation above MSL (Wellington 1953). The rooftop elevation does not include above roof structures such as aerials or chimneys. Captured in 1996 and updated in 1998, 1999, 2002, 2006, 2009, 2011 and 2012 in conjunction with aerial photography refly projects.

Layer ID 1474
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 96289
Elevation Z (elevation)
Services Vector Query API, data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Survey parcel polygons for whole of NZ + Chatham Islands.

Parcel polygons are a space filling layer covering the whole of New Zealand out to the 12 nautical mile limit. All areas are covered and numbered with a static unique parcel ID (PAR_ID). Thus roads, lakes, rivers and the sea are all parcels.

The LINZ data has multi-part polygons, they are now multipart in this version. There are 6,689 multi-part parcels comprising of 16,548 parts out of 2,458,035 total. It is easy to explode into single part for those people that need them.

Parcels have a featurecode that classifies them into high level groups. Not all parcels have a parcel appellation (eg Lot 3 DP 12345), for example vested roads.

The appellation is in a separate table, but has been joined to the parcel polygons as a single field called legal which also has the official parcel area. If it has a tilde (~) then it is the measured area. If the area is different from the official area then the official area is wrong (20% are ridiculous).

Parcels do not have addresses (only the property that has a dwelling is usually allocated an address. and even then a third are not numbered in the valuation roll).

See also: Parcel Boundaries, Parcel Labels, NZ Address Locations

Attributes: PAR_ID, FEATCODE,LEGAL Source LINZ BDE December 2011

Layer ID 1236
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 2477527
Services Vector Query API

Point locations for most current property titles issued in NZ (January 2010)

Titles from the LINZ BDE are not a spatial layer. A single point for each title has been geocoded from the relation tables to the first parcel centroid where a link exists.

Many parcels have more than one title reference, so there may be a stack of points for a title, typical in a crosslease.

There is only one point per title. Where a title spans multiple parcels, a relate would need to be built to identify all the parcels comprising a title. While this can be done for one title, it is impractical for a map. Internal parcel boundaries can be suppressed to show contiguous parcels with the same title. Parcel boundaries are coded for internal boundaries (featurecode = 'parcel_int').

A property (for rating purposes) may contain many titles, but there is no information in the titles or valuation system to display this. The valuation system does not have a complete record of titles for an assessment (amazing isn't it?). Because large properties are often in multiple titles and owners there is no information to amalgamate the parts into a single entity.

A large number (500,000) of titles cannot be automatically located because the parcel that the title refers to is no longer current and is not mapped in LandOnline. Other reasons are ambiguous appellation that prevents a reliable match so they are not linked by LINZ until they come up for a change of title, not just change of owner.

Titles can have multiple owners, so these have been added as an abbreviated list to each title. Owners can be companies or trusts.

Total number 1.78 million.

Warning:
This set of titles is subject to recall if a protected title is issued in error.

Source LINZ BDE Crown Copyright Reserved

Layer ID 518
Data type Vector point
Feature count 1804783
Services Vector Query API

Christchurch / Canterbury Address Points (Feb 2011)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2743
348
Added
27 Feb 2011

Donated by Ollivier & Co for Christchurch post-earthquake efforts.

LINZ maintains a point layer of primary address points allocated by local councils for rateable properties. The principle purpose of this dataset is to allocate voters to the correct electorate. The set is actively maintained, but is still incomplete and some locations are incorrect. Nevertheless it is by far the most comprehensive address database available.

It includes all rural address points (RAPID numbers), commercial addresses and many flat numbers. So numbers are not numeric, there are all sorts of formats included here, sorry. Addresses are not unique. The points are "location addresses", not "postal addresses". For residential town addresses this is normally the same, but for commercial and rural locations they are not the same.

Primary addresses are only the number and alpha parts. Not included is a flat, unit, apartment, floor or other subdivision of the main property address. They should also not be a range, simply the entrance to the property.

Address points only have a number and a key to a road centreline segment. They did not contain a full address or postcode as you see here.

Road names in the address are joined from the road centreline segments, in turn derived from the ASP (Authoritative Streets and Places) database (downloadable from the LINZ site). All road names in this database are official, with a locality (suburb or town) allocated to make the complete address unique within a local council district. There are no postcodes in the ASP of course. Unfortunately there is only one entry linked per road name, which is not always correct for long roads, where the road is a suburb boundary or a road is cut by a TLA boundary. Road names are unique if you include the location and local authority name as part of the name. The postcode alone does not make an address unique because they cover too large an area and NZPost use a different surburb/mailtown/postcode composite key.

These addresses are a "situation" or "location" address, not a "delivery address" or "property identifier". It does not have complete flat or unit numbers, although there are some due to confusion in the purpose of the database, so you will see some.

NZ Post uses this dataset to maintain their GeoPAF file which is a subset of this data because they only supply 'post' addresses where they deliver mail. Therefore no commercial or rural addresses are included in the PAF (PO Boxes are the postal address for these properties). The postcode has been added from an original postcode map, not from the PAF. It is not part of the LINZ or ASP. Postcodes are for bulk mail sorting, not for defining a unique location address. (NZPost will supplement the PAF with all address points for a significant fee.)

Note that an address number is related to the road centreline. No road - no address. It is a linear referencing system, starting at one end, continuing in sequence to the end of the road with odd numbers on one side and even numbers on the other. In towns the spacing is approximately 20 metres, and in the country it is 200 metres.

Addresses are NOT related to parcels and should not be a property key because they are not unique, consider a corner section. They do not define property boundaries. Think of addresses as the location of the letterbox marking the entrance to the property, not the building. The mapped point is generally located 15 metres from the centreline at the entrance or at the neck of a rear section. Address ranges on a point are deprecated in the NZ address standard, a single number should be allocated to the principle entrance so the fire service can find it quickly and unambiguously.

This is different from base address ranges with parity and direction on a road centreline which would be really useful and are common overseas but do not exist for NZ. Even private sets are not done properly. A base address is a simple integer with a range of 1 - 9999.

See [Where The Hell Are You?] ( www.ollivier.co.nz/publication/GITA2005/ollivier_a...) for more explanation on the confusion between an address and a property and the NZ Address Standard AS/NZS 4819:2003.

Source LINZ Bulk Data Extract February 2011, ASP, Postcodes Nov 2006

Layer ID 3162
Data type Vector point
Feature count 179502
Services Vector Query API

LINZ maintains a point layer of primary address points allocated by local councils for rateable properties. The principle purpose of this dataset is to allocate voters to the correct electorate. The set is actively maintained, but is still incomplete and some locations are incorrect. Nevertheless it is by far the most comprehensive address database available.

It includes all rural address points (RAPID numbers), commercial addresses and many flat numbers. So numbers are not numeric, there are all sorts of formats included here, sorry. Addresses are not unique. The points are "location addresses", not "postal addresses". For residential town addresses this is normally the same, but for commercial and rural locations they are not the same.

Primary addresses are only the number and alpha parts. Not included is a flat, unit, apartment, floor or other subdivision of the main property address. They should also not be a range, simply the entrance to the property.

Address points only have a number and a key to a road centreline segment. They did not contain a full address or postcode as you see here.

Road names in the address are joined from the road centreline segments, in turn derived from the ASP (Authoritative Streets and Places) database (downloadable from the LINZ site). All road names in this database are official, with a locality (suburb or town) allocated to make the complete address unique within a local council district. There are no postcodes in the ASP of course. Unfortunately there is only one entry linked per road name, which is not always correct for long roads, where the road is a suburb boundary or a road is cut by a TLA boundary. Road names are unique if you include the location and local authority name as part of the name. The postcode alone does not make an address unique because they cover too large an area and NZPost use a different surburb/mailtown/postcode composite key.

These addresses are a "situation" or "location" address, not a "delivery address" or "property identifier". It does not have complete flat or unit numbers, although there are some due to confusion in the purpose of the database, so you will see some.

NZ Post uses this dataset to maintain their GeoPAF file which is a subset of this data because they only supply 'post' addresses where they deliver mail. Therefore no commercial or rural addresses are included in the PAF (PO Boxes are the postal address for these properties). The postcode has been added from an original postcode map, not from the PAF. It is not part of the LINZ or ASP. Postcodes are for bulk mail sorting, not for defining a unique location address. (NZPost will supplement the PAF with all address points for a significant fee.)

Note that an address number is related to the road centreline. No road - no address. It is a linear referencing system, starting at one end, continuing in sequence to the end of the road with odd numbers on one side and even numbers on the other. In towns the spacing is approximately 20 metres, and in the country it is 200 metres.

Addresses are NOT related to parcels and should not be a property key because they are not unique, consider a corner section. They do not define property boundaries. Think of addresses as the location of the letterbox marking the entrance to the property, not the building. The mapped point is generally located 15 metres from the centreline at the entrance or at the neck of a rear section. Address ranges on a point are deprecated in the NZ address standard, a single number should be allocated to the principle entrance so the fire service can find it quickly and unambiguously.

This is different from base address ranges with parity and direction on a road centreline which would be really useful and are common overseas but do not exist for NZ. Even private sets are not done properly. A base address is a simple integer with a range of 1 - 9999.

See [Where The Hell Are You?] ( www.ollivier.co.nz/publication/GITA2005/ollivier_a...) for more explanation on the confusion between an address and a property and the NZ Address Standard AS/NZS 4819:2003.

Source LINZ Bulk Data Extract December 2011, ASP December 2011, Postcodes Nov 2006

Layer ID 910
Data type Vector point
Feature count 1679625
Services Vector Query API

Cadastral Parcel Labels for NZ

A point at each parcel's approx centre (and always inside) has the parcel appellation. This often easier to use than the parcel and is unique with a key PAR_ID (known as the Static Unique Identifier). Multi-part parcels making up a single parcel (eg an island group) will have one label for each part but only one attribute record.

Road and water 'parcels' have a label, but no appellation, so they have been omitted. Some hydro lake parcels and marine reserves do have an appellation but have been ignored.

The appellation label has backslashes for separating into three lines to make labelling easier. It includes the parcel area in square metres or hectares. If there is a ~ the area has been calculated from the shape. This is generally more accurate than the official area. Multipart parcels have a total area of all the parts in the label with the prefix 'Total'

Maori appellation is in reverse to the general roll with the partition before the block name.

Appellation labels are clear of address labels.

Source LINZ Bulk Data Extract August 2011, Crown Copyright Reserved

Layer ID 1075
Data type Vector multipoint
Feature count 2143694
Services Vector Query API

Public Land Survey System of the United States

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

821
118
Added
13 Apr 2009

This data set portrays the Public Land Surveys of the United States,
including areas of private survey, Donation Land Claims, and Land Grants and Civil Colonies. This is a revised version of the May, 2002 data set.

These data are intended for geographic display and analysis at the national level, and for large regional areas. The data should be displayed and analyzed at scales appropriate for 1:2,000,000-scale
data. No responsibility is assumed by the U.S. Geological Survey in the use of these data.

All lands in the public domain are subject to subdivision by a rectangular system of surveys called the Public Land Survey System (PLSS), established and regulated by the Bureau of Land Management. The original public domain includes the land ceded to the Federal Government by the Thirteen Original States, supplemented with acquisitions from native Indians and foreign powers. It encompasses major portions of the land area of 30 western States.

Under Congressional mandate, cadastral surveys of public lands were undertaken to create parcels suitable for disposal by the Government. The PLSS was developed for this purpose. The PLSS is a rectangular survey system that typically divides the land into 6-mile square townships, which are further subdivided into 1-mile square sections (the data in the National Atlas do not include section-level information). The extension of the rectangular system of surveys over the public domain has been in progress since 1785. These surveys form the basis of patents issued when public lands pass out of Federal ownership.

Certain lands were excluded from the public domain and not subject to survey and disposal. These lands include the beds of navigable bodies of water, national installations such as military reservations and national parks, and areas such as land grants that had already passed to private ownership prior to subdivision by the Government.

Data describing the PLSS is required by Federal surface and mineral management agencies, as well as any organization concerned with and ownership in the 30 western States that were formed from the public domain. Additionally, many agencies have encoded natural resource or environmental inventory data based on the PLSS.

Layer ID 715
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 90919
Services Vector Query API

Parcel boundaries as polylines.

These are often more useful than parcel polygons in simple systems.

Boundary lines are split at nodes (junctions) so they can have a separate featurecode to indicate the edge type. This enables road casings, water boundaries and internal boundaries to be separately symbolised. Boundaries are only drawn once, compared to drawing polygon edges where each parcel is drawn twice.

Since most parcels need to be drawn with no fill, it is much more efficient to create a map with parcel polylines and labels, and only draw sparse polygons with a fill, such as roads, water and reserve polygons.

If you need to do analysis that requires polygons, then select parcels as polygons.

Source LINZ BDE Nov 2008

Layer ID 414
Data type Vector linestring
Feature count 6851145
Services Vector Query API

Trig points and benchmarks for survey purposes. Some points have an elevation in the NZGD2000 datum. If you need more detailled attributes please download the LINZ survey database directly from their website. You can get orthometric heights there (the heights used on the topo maps). This is intended to supplement the end marker features which tag the nodes with an accuracy code. The cor.csv attachment is a coordinate system lookup table to explain the codes.

Source LINZ BDE Nov 2008

Layer ID 407
Data type Vector point
Feature count 537433
Services Vector Query API

Reserve parcels are a subset of the full parcel layer with gazette notices. This is generally public land without a title, but any Crown land with a title has been included, as well as any title with a purpose tag plus any land with a title owned by a local or regional council.

A simple coding has been created using string matching from the Gazette purpose for symbolising. Some of them are a little misleading.

Private titles with a gazette notice are left in for completeness, but would normally be ignored, since they are either conservation covenants or a notice returning road takings to private ownership. They are tagged private and are intended to be suppressed or drawn transparently.

There are lots of problems with the gazette table. It was collected from index maps when digitising the DCDB so it is not complete, and there is no mechanism for ending a gazette within LINZ so many may have been ended, such as teacher's residences, police station sites and many of the utility reserves.

Note that National Parks are not in this set, or a lot of Conservation Estate. This is because the parks were set up with an Act, or the Gazette notice is not recorded, or forest parks have been transferred to DoC by some other legal instrument.

Not all reserve land has public access, eg Defence land.

Source LINZ Bulk Data Extract February 2009, Crown Copyright Reserved

Layer ID 682
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 13372
Services Vector Query API
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