Maryland Watersheds

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17 Oct 2011

This file is a statewide digital watershed file. It was created primarily for state and federal agency use. The watersheds define Strahler (Strahler 1952 p. 1120) third order stream drainage by contours on U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5 minute quadrangle map sheets. Some watersheds drainage areas were defined for streams less than third order and some large area watershed were split to maintain a maximum size of 15,000 acres. The watershed boundaries in this file were developed in a joint state and federal effort to create a consistent watershed file for use by all government agencies with an interest in Maryland's watersheds. The U.S. Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) redefined the third order watersheds creating the HUA14 file. This file contains all of the HUA14 watersheds and some added watersheds to maintain water quality sampling sites. It was also used to create the Maryland Sub-Watershed file.

Purpose

This file was created to identify and define third order watershed from contours on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5 minute quadrangle map sheets. In addition to identifying Strahler third order streams it was necessary to separate certain streams to ensure their association with a proper receiving body of water. Some watersheds were split to maintain the size of watershed areas for state planning purposes. It was intended to maintain a unique watershed number in both this file and HUA14 so that state and federal agencies would have a consistent code for reference. This file has both the federal codes and the state codes for cross referencing. Most of the watersheds in this file are the same as the watershed boundaries in the federal file HUA14. There is one difference in the watershed files. This file has a buffered shoreline added to separate the Chesapeake Bay from land. The parent federal file HUA14 identifies watersheds by the federal Hydrologic Unit Code (HUA or HUC code) while the state file uses the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) watershed codes.

Supplemental Information

See Maryland's Sub-Watershed which is an 8-digit watershed file and its metadata. The State political boundary in this file is used for all Statewide files created by the Geographic Information Services Division of MD DNR. HUA14 Watershed codes are in the file. MDE collects data to the MDE8DIGT code. MD DNR maintains data for the 10 Tributary Strategy Watersheds in the STRACODE and STRANAME field. This file is derived from SHED1998.

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Wellington Region Liquefaction Potential

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22 Feb 2012

Liquefaction potential in the Wellington Region urban areas. This dataset is a compilation of the "liquefaction potential" ArcInfo coverage series with accompanying notes (Publication WRC/PP-T-93/73). An added attribute "Severity" differs slightly to the "SED_CODE" attribute.

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Wellington City Tsunami Evacuation Zones

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Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0 New Zealand

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09 Nov 2010

The tsunami evacuation zones are designed to encompass the range of inundation patterns for many individual possible tsunami. The use of tsunami evacuation areas/zones has the advantage of simplicity for emergency planning, public awareness and understanding.

For more information, please refer to the Civil Defence Tsunami Evacuation Zones Guideline document. Also available are "Tsunami Evacuation Zone Maps" for Greater Wellington.

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Land Environments New Zealand (LENZ) - Level 1 Polygons

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3646
897
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14 Oct 2011

Land Environments of New Zealand (LENZ) is a classification of fifteen climate, landform, and soil variables chosen for their relevance to biological distributions. Classification groups were derived by automatic classification using a multivariate procedure. Four levels of classification detail have been produced from this analysis, containing 20, 100, 200, and 500 groups respectively.
More information is available from the LENZ web site:
www.landcareresearch.co.nz/databases/lenz/

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Feature count 83941
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NZ Rainfall

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Updated
25 Oct 2011

NZ Forest Service rainfall

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Feature count 309
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LUCAS New Zealand Land Use Map 1990-2008 (v011)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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23 Jul 2012

LUCAS New Zealand Land Use Map 1990-2008 (v011)

This supersedes v003 formerly at koordinates.com/layer/1414-new-zealand-land-use-ma....

The Ministry for the Environment, LUCAS Land Use Map is composed of New Zealand-wide land use classifications (12) nominally at 1 January 1990, 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2012 (known as "1990", "2008" and "2012"). These date boundaries were dictated by the First Commitment Period of the Kyoto Protocol. LUM v011 contains land use classifications as at the start of 1990 and 2008. The layer can therefore be used to create either a 1990 or a 2008 land use map depending what field is symbolised.

LUM tracks and quantifies changes in New Zealand land use so that Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) sector carbon accounting can be calculated for national Net Position, Kyoto Protocol and United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) reporting.

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Land Environments New Zealand (LENZ) - Level 4 Polygons

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2648
804
Updated
14 Oct 2011

Land Environments of New Zealand (LENZ) is a classification of fifteen climate, landform, and soil variables chosen for their relevance to biological distributions. Classification groups were derived by automatic classification using a multivariate procedure. Four levels of classification detail have been produced from this analysis, containing 20, 100, 200, and 500 groups respectively.
More information is available from the LENZ web site:
www.landcareresearch.co.nz/databases/lenz/

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Feature count 815185
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Wellington Region Combined Earthquake Hazard

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23 Feb 2012

This Combined Earthquake hazard shapefile is a compilation of all "combined earthquake hazard" ArcInfo coverages in major urban areas of the Wellington Region. The coverages represent overlays of all previous earthquake hazard data. i.e. 1: Area of tsunami inundation 2: 20m buffer along major fault traces 3: Ground shaking 4: Liquefaction potential 5: Slope failure. Map publication reference: WRC/RP-T-96/15 For notes on how this coverage was created refer to: Mapping methodology and Risk Mitigation Measures Publication: WRC/RP-T-96/22. Refer also to Consultant Ian R Brown Associates at www.irba.co.nz/.

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Wellington Region Tsunami Evacuation Zones

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09 Feb 2012

Wellington Region Tsunami Evacuation Zones. Wellington region tsunami evacuation data containing three zones; red, orange and yellow, corresponding to different threat levels.

The layer was manually digitised onto orthophoto coverage based on raw polygon data derived from tsunami modelling and verified with elevation data to ensure accuracy and consistency.

The zones are based on probabilistic tsunami wave heights derived from previously recorded events that have affected the Wellington region and modelling tsunami from known source areas.

The risk varies around the Wellington region. It is highest along the Wairarapa and south coast, moderate around Wellington Harbour and low to moderate around Porirua and along the Kapiti Coast.

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California 2050 Projected Urban Growth

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1910
149
Updated
09 May 2010

50 year Projected Urban Growth scenarios. Base year is 2000. Projected year in this dataset is 2050.

By 2020, most forecasters agree, California will be home to between 43 and 46 million residents-up from 35 million today. Beyond 2020 the size of California's population is less certain. Depending on the composition of the population, and future fertility and migration rates, California's 2050 population could be as little as 50 million or as much as 70 million. One hundred years from now, if present trends continue, California could conceivably have as many as 90 million residents.
Where these future residents will live and work is unclear. For most of the 20th Century, two-thirds of Californians have lived south of the Tehachapi Mountains and west of the San Jacinto Mountains-in that part of the state commonly referred to as Southern California. Yet most of coastal Southern California is already highly urbanized, and there is relatively little vacant land available for new development. More recently, slow-growth policies in Northern California and declining developable land supplies in Southern California are squeezing ever more of the state's population growth into the San Joaquin Valley.
How future Californians will occupy the landscape is also unclear. Over the last fifty years, the state's population has grown increasingly urban. Today, nearly 95 percent of Californians live in metropolitan areas, mostly at densities less than ten persons per acre. Recent growth patterns have strongly favored locations near freeways, most of which where built in the 1950s and 1960s. With few new freeways on the planning horizon, how will California's future growth organize itself in space? By national standards, California's large urban areas are already reasonably dense, and economic theory suggests that densities should increase further as California's urban regions continue to grow. In practice, densities have been rising in some urban counties, but falling in others.

These are important issues as California plans its long-term future. Will California have enough land of the appropriate types and in the right locations to accommodate its projected population growth? Will future population growth consume ever-greater amounts of irreplaceable resource lands and habitat? Will jobs continue decentralizing, pushing out the boundaries of metropolitan areas? Will development densities be sufficient to support mass transit, or will future Californians be stuck in perpetual gridlock? Will urban and resort and recreational growth in the Sierra Nevada and Trinity Mountain regions lead to the over-fragmentation of precious natural habitat? How much water will be needed by California's future industries, farms, and residents, and where will that water be stored? Where should future highway, transit, and high-speed rail facilities and rights-of-way be located? Most of all, how much will all this growth cost, both economically, and in terms of changes in California's quality of life?
Clearly, the more precise our current understanding of how and where California is likely to grow, the sooner and more inexpensively appropriate lands can be acquired for purposes of conservation, recreation, and future facility siting. Similarly, the more clearly future urbanization patterns can be anticipated, the greater our collective ability to undertake sound city, metropolitan, rural, and bioregional planning.

Consider two scenarios for the year 2100. In the first, California's population would grow to 80 million persons and would occupy the landscape at an average density of eight persons per acre, the current statewide urban average. Under this scenario, and assuming that 10% percent of California's future population growth would occur through infill-that is, on existing urban land-California's expanding urban population would consume an additional 5.06 million acres of currently undeveloped land. As an alternative, assume the share of infill development were increased to 30%, and that new population were accommodated at a density of about 12 persons per acre-which is the current average density of the City of Los Angeles. Under this second scenario, California's urban population would consume an additional 2.6 million acres of currently undeveloped land. While both scenarios accommodate the same amount of population growth and generate large increments of additional urban development-indeed, some might say even the second scenario allows far too much growth and development-the second scenario is far kinder to California's unique natural landscape.

This report presents the results of a series of baseline population and urban growth projections for California's 38 urban counties through the year 2100. Presented in map and table form, these projections are based on extrapolations of current population trends and recent urban development trends. The next section, titled Approach, outlines the methodology and data used to develop the various projections. The following section, Baseline Scenario, reviews the projections themselves. A final section, entitled Baseline Impacts, quantitatively assesses the impacts of the baseline projections on wetland, hillside, farmland and habitat loss.

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