State of California

United States of America Data

California Hillshade (30m)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4810
631
Updated
04 Apr 2009

This dataset was last updated on Koordinates on 04 Apr 2009.

California grey-shade hillshade at 30m resolution.

Source: www.atlas.ca.gov/download.html

Layer ID 692
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution 30.000m

California 2050 Projected Urban Growth

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3538
166
Updated
02 Apr 2009

This dataset was last updated on Koordinates on 02 Apr 2009.

50 year Projected Urban Growth scenarios. Base year is 2000. Projected year in this dataset is 2050.

By 2020, most forecasters agree, California will be home to between 43 and 46 million residents-up from 35 million today. Beyond 2020 the size of California's population is less certain. Depending on the composition of the population, and future fertility and migration rates, California's 2050 population could be as little as 50 million or as much as 70 million. One hundred years from now, if present trends continue, California could conceivably have as many as 90 million residents.
Where these future residents will live and work is unclear. For most of the 20th Century, two-thirds of Californians have lived south of the Tehachapi Mountains and west of the San Jacinto Mountains-in that part of the state commonly referred to as Southern California. Yet most of coastal Southern California is already highly urbanized, and there is relatively little vacant land available for new development. More recently, slow-growth policies in Northern California and declining developable land supplies in Southern California are squeezing ever more of the state's population growth into the San Joaquin Valley.
How future Californians will occupy the landscape is also unclear. Over the last fifty years, the state's population has grown increasingly urban. Today, nearly 95 percent of Californians live in metropolitan areas, mostly at densities less than ten persons per acre. Recent growth patterns have strongly favored locations near freeways, most of which where built in the 1950s and 1960s. With few new freeways on the planning horizon, how will California's future growth organize itself in space? By national standards, California's large urban areas are already reasonably dense, and economic theory suggests that densities should increase further as California's urban regions continue to grow. In practice, densities have been rising in some urban counties, but falling in others.

These are important issues as California plans its long-term future. Will California have enough land of the appropriate types and in the right locations to accommodate its projected population growth? Will future population growth consume ever-greater amounts of irreplaceable resource lands and habitat? Will jobs continue decentralizing, pushing out the boundaries of metropolitan areas? Will development densities be sufficient to support mass transit, or will future Californians be stuck in perpetual gridlock? Will urban and resort and recreational growth in the Sierra Nevada and Trinity Mountain regions lead to the over-fragmentation of precious natural habitat? How much water will be needed by California's future industries, farms, and residents, and where will that water be stored? Where should future highway, transit, and high-speed rail facilities and rights-of-way be located? Most of all, how much will all this growth cost, both economically, and in terms of changes in California's quality of life?
Clearly, the more precise our current understanding of how and where California is likely to grow, the sooner and more inexpensively appropriate lands can be acquired for purposes of conservation, recreation, and future facility siting. Similarly, the more clearly future urbanization patterns can be anticipated, the greater our collective ability to undertake sound city, metropolitan, rural, and bioregional planning.

Consider two scenarios for the year 2100. In the first, California's population would grow to 80 million persons and would occupy the landscape at an average density of eight persons per acre, the current statewide urban average. Under this scenario, and assuming that 10% percent of California's future population growth would occur through infill-that is, on existing urban land-California's expanding urban population would consume an additional 5.06 million acres of currently undeveloped land. As an alternative, assume the share of infill development were increased to 30%, and that new population were accommodated at a density of about 12 persons per acre-which is the current average density of the City of Los Angeles. Under this second scenario, California's urban population would consume an additional 2.6 million acres of currently undeveloped land. While both scenarios accommodate the same amount of population growth and generate large increments of additional urban development-indeed, some might say even the second scenario allows far too much growth and development-the second scenario is far kinder to California's unique natural landscape.

This report presents the results of a series of baseline population and urban growth projections for California's 38 urban counties through the year 2100. Presented in map and table form, these projections are based on extrapolations of current population trends and recent urban development trends. The next section, titled Approach, outlines the methodology and data used to develop the various projections. The following section, Baseline Scenario, reviews the projections themselves. A final section, entitled Baseline Impacts, quantitatively assesses the impacts of the baseline projections on wetland, hillside, farmland and habitat loss.

Layer ID 671
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 10278
Services Vector Query API

California 2020 Projected Urban Growth

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3362
112
Updated
02 Apr 2009

This dataset was last updated on Koordinates on 02 Apr 2009.

20 year Projected Urban Growth scenarios. Base year is 2000. Projected year in this dataset is 2020.

By 2020, most forecasters agree, California will be home to between 43 and 46 million residents-up from 35 million today. Beyond 2020 the size of California's population is less certain. Depending on the composition of the population, and future fertility and migration rates, California's 2050 population could be as little as 50 million or as much as 70 million. One hundred years from now, if present trends continue, California could conceivably have as many as 90 million residents.

Where these future residents will live and work is unclear. For most of the 20th Century, two-thirds of Californians have lived south of the Tehachapi Mountains and west of the San Jacinto Mountains-in that part of the state commonly referred to as Southern California. Yet most of coastal Southern California is already highly urbanized, and there is relatively little vacant land available for new development. More recently, slow-growth policies in Northern California and declining developable land supplies in Southern California are squeezing ever more of the state's population growth into the San Joaquin Valley.

How future Californians will occupy the landscape is also unclear. Over the last fifty years, the state's population has grown increasingly urban. Today, nearly 95 percent of Californians live in metropolitan areas, mostly at densities less than ten persons per acre. Recent growth patterns have strongly favored locations near freeways, most of which where built in the 1950s and 1960s. With few new freeways on the planning horizon, how will California's future growth organize itself in space? By national standards, California's large urban areas are already reasonably dense, and economic theory suggests that densities should increase further as California's urban regions continue to grow. In practice, densities have been rising in some urban counties, but falling in others.

These are important issues as California plans its long-term future. Will California have enough land of the appropriate types and in the right locations to accommodate its projected population growth? Will future population growth consume ever-greater amounts of irreplaceable resource lands and habitat? Will jobs continue decentralizing, pushing out the boundaries of metropolitan areas? Will development densities be sufficient to support mass transit, or will future Californians be stuck in perpetual gridlock? Will urban and resort and recreational growth in the Sierra Nevada and Trinity Mountain regions lead to the over-fragmentation of precious natural habitat? How much water will be needed by California's future industries, farms, and residents, and where will that water be stored? Where should future highway, transit, and high-speed rail facilities and rights-of-way be located? Most of all, how much will all this growth cost, both economically, and in terms of changes in California's quality of life?

Clearly, the more precise our current understanding of how and where California is likely to grow, the sooner and more inexpensively appropriate lands can be acquired for purposes of conservation, recreation, and future facility siting. Similarly, the more clearly future urbanization patterns can be anticipated, the greater our collective ability to undertake sound city, metropolitan, rural, and bioregional planning.

Consider two scenarios for the year 2100. In the first, California's population would grow to 80 million persons and would occupy the landscape at an average density of eight persons per acre, the current statewide urban average. Under this scenario, and assuming that 10% percent of California's future population growth would occur through infill-that is, on existing urban land-California's expanding urban population would consume an additional 5.06 million acres of currently undeveloped land. As an alternative, assume the share of infill development were increased to 30%, and that new population were accommodated at a density of about 12 persons per acre-which is the current average density of the City of Los Angeles. Under this second scenario, California's urban population would consume an additional 2.6 million acres of currently undeveloped land. While both scenarios accommodate the same amount of population growth and generate large increments of additional urban development-indeed, some might say even the second scenario allows far too much growth and development-the second scenario is far kinder to California's unique natural landscape.

This report presents the results of a series of baseline population and urban growth projections for California's 38 urban counties through the year 2100. Presented in map and table form, these projections are based on extrapolations of current population trends and recent urban development trends. The next section, titled Approach, outlines the methodology and data used to develop the various projections. The following section, Baseline Scenario, reviews the projections themselves. A final section, entitled Baseline Impacts, quantitatively assesses the impacts of the baseline projections on wetland, hillside, farmland and habitat loss.

Layer ID 670
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 9097
Services Vector Query API

California Private Water Districts (2003)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1200
65
Updated
07 May 2009

This dataset was last updated on Koordinates on 07 May 2009.

Private Water District boundaries are areas where private contracts provide water to the district in California. This database is designed as a regions polygon database and is updated when sufficient number of changes have occured to warrant an update. Updates are determined by the needs of the local office. Separate databases are used for maintenance purposes. Boundaries are continually being updated as changes are identified by the Water Districts. The boundaries are not current for all Water Districts found in the database at the same time due to the update methods employed. There may be conflicts in the boundaries between districts due to the time of update and review process associated with each Water District. Other problems may be associated with Water District name changes that have not been updated and possibly new Water Districts not being included due to lack of information. This database represents the most current and accurate understanding of the boundary location and current name of the Water Districts.

The Private Water District boundaries database is cooperatively shared between the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), Mid-Pacific regional office (MP), MPGIS Service Center and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR). The USBR maintains this database with the voluntary assistance of the Private Water Districts. This database allows the USBR and DWR to display and analyze this information.

This database is not intended to be used as a land survey or representation of land for conveyance or tax purposes. The database is available to all users that may require this information.

Source: www.atlas.ca.gov/download.html

Layer ID 755
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 693
Services Vector Query API

County Boundaries (2004)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1090
114
Updated
07 May 2009

This dataset was last updated on Koordinates on 07 May 2009.

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (using data from BOR and DOC FMMP) 2004 County Boundaries (1:24000) vector digital data gis.ca.gov/casil/boundaries/cnty24k In late 1996, the Dept of Conservation (DOC) surveyed state and federal agencies about the county boundary coverage they used. As a result, DOC adopted the 1:24, 000 scale Bureau of Reclamation dataset (USGS source) for their Farmland Mapping and Monitoring Program (FMMP) but with several major and minor modifications. Detailed documentation of these changes is provided by FMMP and included as part of the data dictionary. Ideally, state and federal agencies should be using the same framework data for common themes such as county boundaries. This layer provides an initial offering as "best available" at 1:24,000 scale. Additional improvements, including a review of data sources for the coastline, can be added over time based on interagency review and agreement on proposed changes.

Source: www.atlas.ca.gov/download.html

Layer ID 756
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 172
Services Vector Query API

California Color Hillshade (90m)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1023
109
Added
03 Apr 2009

This dataset was first added to Koordinates on 03 Apr 2009.

California color hillshade at 90m resolution.

Source: www.atlas.ca.gov/download.html

Layer ID 681
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution 90.900m

Ocean off California

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

784
40
Updated
02 Apr 2009

This dataset was last updated on Koordinates on 02 Apr 2009.

Ocean off California.

Source: www.atlas.ca.gov/download.html

Layer ID 676
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 2
Services Vector Query API

Bay Delta Vegetation

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

812
39
Updated
01 Apr 2009

This dataset was last updated on Koordinates on 01 Apr 2009.

CDF-FRAP compiled the "best available" land cover data into a single data layer, to support the various analyses required for the 2002 Forest and Range Assessment. Typically the most current and detailed data were collected for various regions of the state or for unique mapping efforts (farmland, wetlands, riparian vegetation). Decision rules were developed that controlled which layers were given priority in areas of overlap. Cross-walks were used to compile the various sources into the common California Wildlife Wabitat Relationships (CWHR) system classification. Data sources had unique scale/resolution, multi-source data provided as 100m GRID. The original 1/2002 data used to support the Asessment is also available from the FRAP site - this record corresponds to the most recent updated version of the data (10/2002), which incorporates better data for the Mojave & NE Colorado Desert areas.

Data is clipped using California Bioregion boundaries for use in the California Digital Conservation Atlas. Data is dissolved on the 'WHR13NAME' field for display purposes in the Atlas.

Source: www.atlas.ca.gov/download.html
See attached metadata file.

Layer ID 661
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 123891
Services Vector Query API

California National Highway Planning

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

819
81
Added
02 Apr 2009

This dataset was first added to Koordinates on 02 Apr 2009.

This is a subset of the full dataset, only features in California are used. The data was reprojected to CaSIL's standard projection. There were no changes or alterations to the attribute data. The original metadata is below:

The National Highway Planning Network is a comprehensive network database of the nation's major highway system. It consists of the nation's highways comprised of Rural Arterials, Urban Principal Arterials and all National Highway System routes. The data set covers the 48 contiguous States plus the District of Columbia, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. The nominal scale of the data set is 1:100,000 with a maximal positional error of ±80 meters.

The primary purpose of this geospatial data set is to serve the FHWA needs in highway planning, policy analysis, visualization of the Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) database and network modeling. The NHPN is the digital source used for coding and publishing the FHWA approved National Highway System maps.

The NHPN version 2005.08 contains 8 polyline features (RECIDs 4000057, 4000855, 41000287, 41002220, 48000952, 72001074, 72001170, and 72001488) that are each defined by more than 500 shape points. These features will not import correctly into the workstation version of ArcInfo, which has a 500 shapepoint limit. When importing into the workstation version of ArcInfo, the 8 features will be automatically split into 2 features each. As part of this process, attributes are simply duplicated on the split features. Because of this, attributes such as MILES and KM become invalid for these features.

Source: www.atlas.ca.gov/download.html

Layer ID 672
Data type Vector linestring
Feature count 16752
Services Vector Query API

California Populated Areas (2006)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

730
59
Updated
02 Apr 2009

This dataset was last updated on Koordinates on 02 Apr 2009.

The 'GEONAMES- populated places (ppl)' layer is a subset of the larger "GEONAMES" layer. This layer contain names of places or areas "with clustered or scattered buildings and a permanent human population (city, settlement, town, village)" in California.

Dataset extracted from 'gnis' and queried on major populated citites for use in the Digital Atlas.

This layer is useful for furnishing landmarks on plots. It can also serve as a base data layer. The features help to orient the viewer and give a sense of scale to the plot.

Source: www.atlas.ca.gov/download.html

Layer ID 669
Data type Vector point
Feature count 6904
Services Vector Query API
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