PUP Volcanic View Shafts

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10671
445
Added
06 Oct 2013

This dataset was first added to Koordinates on 06 Oct 2013.

The volcanic view shafts overlay has been derived from the Regional Policy Statement and survey information from 2005 plus additional survey work undertaken by Stephen Brown Consultants Limited

Layer ID 6350
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 138
DimensionsZ values
Services Vector Query API

PUP Maori Cultural Heritage

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5033
594
Added
07 Oct 2013

This dataset was first added to Koordinates on 07 Oct 2013.

The lack of knowledge associated with Maori cultural sites, features and landscapes in Auckland results in the continued threat of degradation and destruction of the values associated with our Maori cultural heritage from the adverse effects of subdivision, use and development.Where sufficient information exists on the location and values of sites, the Unitary Plan can afford protection through scheduling of sites through the Sites of Significance to Mana Whenua overlay. Scheduling offers the greatest protection through the Unitary Plan, as a significant amount of research is required to provide a robust basis for scheduling these sites.Despite a large number of Mana Whenua groups having a strong association with the Auckland area, within Auckland very few sites have been scheduled. The lack of scheduling may be due to a number of reasons including the sensitivity of the information surrounding the protection of the site, and the reluctance of Mana Whenua to make this information available in a public document. There are thousands of areas, features and sites within Auckland where there is a high likelihood of Maori cultural heritage being discovered or affected. It is important that there are robust processes to ensure that the values associated with areas, features and sites that are not scheduled are also appropriately recognised and managed. Knowledge of where Maori cultural heritage may exist helps reduce the risk of damage, enable development that properly reflects the values associated with the context of an area, informs land owners and applicants of the characteristics of their site, and helps to avoid major time and cost implications to applicants when development is halted by accidental discovery.Sources such as Treaty of Waitangi settlement legislation and deeds of settlement provide robust evidence on areas, features and sites of significance to Mana Whenua for their tangible or intangible values. Other documents identify locations where Maori cultural heritage has been recorded or discovered in the past. This is further supported by Mana Whenua involvement in accidental discovery protocols. These information sources have been collated into a non-statutory Maori cultural heritage alert layer, which will be updated as new information becomes available on council’s geographic information system (GIS). The use of an alert layer provides a precautionary approach to management of Maori cultural heritage and an early warning to know when engagement with Mana Whenua or a cultural impact assessment may be required.If Maori cultural heritage is identified through engagement or discovered, the relevant Maori cultural heritage rules will apply. Mana Whenua have the right to choose not to identify places or values of historic, cultural or spiritual significance or special value. Further work will be undertaken with Mana Whenua to formally review and consider the most appropriate method to protect these areas, features and sites to achieve Mana Whenua aspirations.

Maori cultural landscapes (areas of significance to Mana Whenua)Maori cultural heritage extends beyond individual sites of significance and includes wider ‘areas’ of historic occupation, where Mana Whenua values and associations with the landscape are reflected through landmarks, place names, portages, areas of seasonal occupation and historical transport routes that are also of importance to Mana Whenua.Mana Whenua liken their cultural landscape to their cultural footprint/tapuwae – which is of Maori cultural heritage in its own right. It is not site-specific; rather it is the context of the landscape, the volcanic maunga fields, and the numerous waterways and tributaries overlaid by layers of Maori history. Maori cultural landscapes provide the context and identify relationships within which areas, features and sites of significance to Mana Whenua exist, recognising that sites do not exist in isolation. It is important that Mana Whenua values and associations present in the landscape are retained so that future generations can pass on traditional skills and knowledge. In some cases, protection is appropriate for areas, features and sites that are important to the wider Maori community and not specifically for their significance to Mana Whenua.It is important that Mana Whenua values and associations are considered early in the planning process. Ensuring sensitive development and reflection of these values and associations in the landscape can often add value to subdivision, use and development. The connection of Mana Whenua to their culture and traditions is enhanced through the reflection of their values and associations in the land and seascape.Maori cultural landscapes are identified in the Maori cultural heritage alert layer as guidance. The Maori cultural heritage controls in Part 4 - Rules relate to unscheduled areas, features and sites:a. where Maori cultural heritage is known to be present or there is a high likelihood of being presentb. that are identified through accidental discovery (e.g. koiwi, archaeology and artefacts of Maori origin).The controls recognise that the majority of Maori cultural heritage is not scheduled within the Unitary Plan and provides a form of protection for these areas, features and sites by adopting a precautionary approach.Information managementMaori knowledge is traditionally passed down orally from one generation to the next. Tohunga and kaumatua are repositories of knowledge and are highly regarded for their knowledge of the spiritual and physical realms. These customs are still commonplace in Maori culture and it is important that sensitive information is managed in accordance with protocols that have been agreed with Mana Whenua.

Layer ID 6437
Data type Vector point
Feature count 6833
Services Vector Query API

PUP Stormwater Management Area

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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17353
253
Added
07 Oct 2013

This dataset was first added to Koordinates on 07 Oct 2013.

The Stormwater Management Area-flow overlay aims to protect Auckland's aquatic biodiversity.Auckland has numerous small and narrow streams. Despite their small size, these streams are home to much of our aquatic biodiversity. This biodiversity is threatened by the effects of ongoing urban development.The creation of impervious surfaces in a catchment undergoing development increases the rate and volume of stormwater runoff. This change in hydrology, unless managed, can have a significant adverse effect on streams within the catchment. Increased flows and stormwater volumes can accelerate stream erosion, particularly in steeper upper catchment areas, and can create hydrological conditions that do not support healthy aquatic ecosystems. In developed urban catchments with large areas of impervious surface, increased runoff is one of the primary causes of degraded stream health. However, in areas yet to be developed, or with existing development at low levels, development can be enabled while also protecting and enhancing in-stream biodiversity and other stream values, reducing and managing stormwater runoff, and other measures such as enhancing riparian margins. High-value, and potential value, streams at risk or particularly susceptible to the effects from development have been identified and their contributing catchment areas mapped (stormwater management area: flow (SMAF)). Future development and redevelopment in these catchments will be subject to controls to manage stormwater runoff to enable development, while at the same time protecting Auckland’s aquatic biodiversity from further decline.

Layer ID 6390
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 155
Services Vector Query API

PUP Significant Ecological Areas

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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13311
931
Added
07 Oct 2013

This dataset was first added to Koordinates on 07 Oct 2013.

Identifies areas of significant indigenous vegetation and significant habitats of indigenous fauna. Council is required to recognise and provide for the protection of significant indigenous vegetation and significant habitats of indigenous fauna of as matter of national importance by section 6b of the Resource Management

Layer ID 6425
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 3740
Services Vector Query API

PUP Historic Heritage Extent Of Place

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2099
187
Added
07 Oct 2013

This dataset was first added to Koordinates on 07 Oct 2013.

This overlay identifies places of significant historic heritage value which are placed on the historic heritage schedule (Appendix 9) and are also shown on the planning maps. Places on the schedule have been evaluated and have significant historic heritage value to their locality, the region or nation.A scheduled historic heritage place can range from an individual feature to a place that encompasses multiple features and/or properties, including land or water within the public realm. They include conservation areas.Each historic heritage place has been assigned a category with associated controls on protection, development, demolition and use. Controls of places subject to the overlay may differ from the underlying zone. A historic heritage place may include one of more structures and a defined area surrounding them.The rules in this overlay apply to all land and water within the extent of the scheduled historic heritage place. There are three categories of scheduled historic heritage places: 1. category A places: have exceptional overall heritage significance to the Auckland region or a greater geographic area2. category B places: have considerable overall heritage significance to the locality or greater geographic area3. conservation areas: places with an overall concentration of historic heritage places with a strong relationship to each other, and are substantially unchanged since the period of the place’s significance. As a group, they will have at least considerable overall heritage significance to the locality or greater geographic area. Some scheduled historic heritage places are identified as category A* in Appendix 9. These are the ‘top tier’ places from the heritage schedules of the legacy district plans of Rodney, Franklin and Papakura district councils; the Manukau and Waitakere city councils, and the Auckland Regional Coastal Plan. They have been distinguished from category A places because slightly different rules relate to the destruction or demolition of their primary features. Category A^ places are the top tier legacy places from the heritage schedule of the legacy North Shore District Plan. The primary features of Category A and A* places are those which form the fundamental basis of why a historic heritage place has been scheduled. These primary features are identified int he schedule and shown on the planning maps. In addition to the requirements of the Unitary Plan, the Historic Places Act 1993 requires an applicant to obtain an authority to modify from the New Zealand Historic Places Trust before any archaeological site as defined in that act is destroyed, damaged or modified. This includes sites that are not recorded.The rules relating to land use in the underlying zone will apply to scheduled historic heritage places. However, where an application is sought to use a scheduled historic heritage place for an activity that isn’t provided for as a permitted activity in the underlying zone. In considering the application, the council have regard to the fact that the place is a scheduled historic heritage place, and the extent to which the proposed use will secure its long-term viability, impact on adjoining neighbourhood and retention. The rules for scheduled historic heritage places recognises the importance of ongoing repair and maintenance of historic heritage places and allows these as a permitted activity, subject to complying with permitted activity standards.

Layer ID 6408
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 1875
Services Vector Query API

PUP Historic Heritage

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3337
287
Added
07 Oct 2013

This dataset was first added to Koordinates on 07 Oct 2013.

This overlay identifies places of significant historic heritage value which are placed on the historic heritage schedule (Appendix 9) and are also shown on the planning maps. Places on the schedule have been evaluated and have significant historic heritage value to their locality, the region or nation.A scheduled historic heritage place can range from an individual feature to a place that encompasses multiple features and/or properties, including land or water within the public realm. They include conservation areas.Each historic heritage place has been assigned a category with associated controls on protection, development, demolition and use. Controls of places subject to the overlay may differ from the underlying zone. A historic heritage place may include one of more structures and a defined area surrounding them.The rules in this overlay apply to all land and water within the extent of the scheduled historic heritage place. There are three categories of scheduled historic heritage places: 1. category A places: have exceptional overall heritage significance to the Auckland region or a greater geographic area2. category B places: have considerable overall heritage significance to the locality or greater geographic area3. conservation areas: places with an overall concentration of historic heritage places with a strong relationship to each other, and are substantially unchanged since the period of the place’s significance. As a group, they will have at least considerable overall heritage significance to the locality or greater geographic area. Some scheduled historic heritage places are identified as category A* in Appendix 9. These are the ‘top tier’ places from the heritage schedules of the legacy district plans of Rodney, Franklin and Papakura district councils; the Manukau and Waitakere city councils, and the Auckland Regional Coastal Plan. They have been distinguished from category A places because slightly different rules relate to the destruction or demolition of their primary features. Category A^ places are the top tier legacy places from the heritage schedule of the legacy North Shore District Plan. The primary features of Category A and A* places are those which form the fundamental basis of why a historic heritage place has been scheduled. These primary features are identified int he schedule and shown on the planning maps. In addition to the requirements of the Unitary Plan, the Historic Places Act 1993 requires an applicant to obtain an authority to modify from the New Zealand Historic Places Trust before any archaeological site as defined in that act is destroyed, damaged or modified. This includes sites that are not recorded.The rules relating to land use in the underlying zone will apply to scheduled historic heritage places. However, where an application is sought to use a scheduled historic heritage place for an activity that isn’t provided for as a permitted activity in the underlying zone. In considering the application, the council have regard to the fact that the place is a scheduled historic heritage place, and the extent to which the proposed use will secure its long-term viability, impact on adjoining neighbourhood and retention. The rules for scheduled historic heritage places recognises the importance of ongoing repair and maintenance of historic heritage places and allows these as a permitted activity, subject to complying with permitted activity standards.

Layer ID 6472
Data type Vector point
Feature count 2397
Services Vector Query API

PUP Sites And Places Of Significance To Mana Whenua

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3858
230
Added
07 Oct 2013

This dataset was first added to Koordinates on 07 Oct 2013.

The Sites of significance to Mana Whenua overlay identifies areas, features and sites that have been scheduled and protected for their Maori values. Where there is sensitive information regarding the significance of the sites special protocols agreed with Mana Whenua will outline the management of this information.

Mana Whenua are aware of many other areas, features and sites that may be equally or more significant, and acknowledge there may be shared interests over scheduled locations. It is intended to identify further areas, features and sites nominated by Mana Whenua through future plan changes including those identified through other legislation.

Layer ID 6372
Data type Vector point
Feature count 77
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PUP Maori Land

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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1997
122
Added
07 Oct 2013

This dataset was first added to Koordinates on 07 Oct 2013.

This overlay recognises the unique legal and governance framework for land subject to Te Ture Whenua Maori Act 1993, (‘Maori land’). It identifies Maori land in Auckland, enables minor development and provides for an integrated Maori land development plan to enable a range of activities on Maori land. The overlay provides a basis for better coordination between landowners, the Maori Land Court and the council in managing the resource of Maori land.

The overlay applies to Maori land subject to Te Ture Whenua Maori Act 1993. Where the underlying zone is the Maori Purpose zone, the provisions of this overlay do not apply.

Layer ID 6436
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 372
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PUP Notable Trees

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4052
214
Added
07 Oct 2013

This dataset was first added to Koordinates on 07 Oct 2013.

Trees - urban trees, notable trees, coastal trees

Trees collectively contribute to the unique natural character of many of our neighbourhoods, riparian and coastal areas. Trees provide an important role in the functioning of our environment as they support bird life and provide shelter and privacy, assimilate carbon and improve air quality. Trees and native vegetation, particularly pohutukawa, are an integral part of the coastal landscape of Auckland. They make a significant contribution to the visual amenity and natural character of the coast while also providing important ecological and site stability benefits.Individual trees and groups of trees that have met the notable tree criteria are considered to be among the most significant trees in Auckland. These trees have been specifically identified to ensure the benefits they provide are retained for future generations.

Trees in roads and reserves

Trees located within roads and reserves are an important public asset and need to be managed appropriately. As urban areas intensify, public open space will be relied on to a greater extent to provide amenity in these areas. Trees in our parks and reserves contribute towards Auckland being a desirable place to live and are an important part of Auckland’s natural heritage and identity. Trees located within roads provide a range of values including making roads more attractive and contributing to pedestrian amenity. Environmentally, trees provide important functional values in terms of storing carbon and providing habitat and food for wildlife. The road reserve has a large range of uses particularly for network utilities and at times these can conflict with the presence of trees. A balance of these competing uses needs to be achieved.

Layer ID 6392
Data type Vector point
Feature count 3149
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PUP Ridgeline Protection

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1289
35
Added
07 Oct 2013

This dataset was first added to Koordinates on 07 Oct 2013.

describe sites subject to additional controls to protect ridgeline.

Layer ID 6389
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 2
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