Survey parcel polygons for whole of NZ + Chatham Islands.

Parcel polygons are a space filling layer covering the whole of New Zealand out to the 12 nautical mile limit. All areas are covered and numbered with a static unique parcel ID (PAR_ID). Thus roads, lakes, rivers and the sea are all parcels.

The LINZ data has multi-part polygons, they are now multipart in this version. There are 6,689 multi-part parcels comprising of 16,548 parts out of 2,458,035 total. It is easy to explode into single part for those people that need them.

Parcels have a featurecode that classifies them into high level groups. Not all parcels have a parcel appellation (eg Lot 3 DP 12345), for example vested roads.

The appellation is in a separate table, but has been joined to the parcel polygons as a single field called legal which also has the official parcel area. If it has a tilde (~) then it is the measured area. If the area is different from the official area then the official area is wrong (20% are ridiculous).

Parcels do not have addresses (only the property that has a dwelling is usually allocated an address. and even then a third are not numbered in the valuation roll).

See also: Parcel Boundaries, Parcel Labels, NZ Address Locations

Attributes: PAR_ID, FEATCODE,LEGAL Source LINZ BDE December 2011

Layer ID 1236
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 2477527
Services Vector Query API

NZ Map Series 260 1:50,000 sheet series for New Zealand Map Grid Topographic Maps. OBSOLETE since 2001.

Each sheet is 30km x 40km in landscape layout which needs an oversize page to print at 1:50,000. The series are coded with a letter and number eg R11 where the letter is the column (A-Z)and the row is the number (1-50). This is a non-intutive pattern when sorted.

The series is widely used for larger scale sheet series because they are nested within and have the main name, scale, and subgrid numbers. Aerial photo tiles, district plans, and many other sets use this convention.

Note that the thumbnail looks very distorted because it is not projected in New Zealand Map Grid.

The new series is called NZTopo50 which is designed for New Zealand Transverse Mercator projection, and has similar nested sub series.

Layer ID 413
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 336
Services Vector Query API

NZ 80m Digital Elevation Model

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3212
1220
Updated
27 Mar 2010

New Zealand 80m Digital Elevation Model from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission.

Layer ID 1418
Data type Grid
Resolution 80.000m
Services Raster Query API

NZ Rainfall

3124
1244
Updated
25 Oct 2011

NZ Forest Service rainfall

Layer ID 305
Data type Vector multilinestring
Feature count 309
Services Vector Query API

Suitable for 1:250,000 scale maps. From NZ Forest Service

Layer ID 306
Data type Vector linestring
Feature count 680
Services Vector Query API

Point locations for most current property titles issued in NZ (January 2010)

Titles from the LINZ BDE are not a spatial layer. A single point for each title has been geocoded from the relation tables to the first parcel centroid where a link exists.

Many parcels have more than one title reference, so there may be a stack of points for a title, typical in a crosslease.

There is only one point per title. Where a title spans multiple parcels, a relate would need to be built to identify all the parcels comprising a title. While this can be done for one title, it is impractical for a map. Internal parcel boundaries can be suppressed to show contiguous parcels with the same title. Parcel boundaries are coded for internal boundaries (featurecode = 'parcel_int').

A property (for rating purposes) may contain many titles, but there is no information in the titles or valuation system to display this. The valuation system does not have a complete record of titles for an assessment (amazing isn't it?). Because large properties are often in multiple titles and owners there is no information to amalgamate the parts into a single entity.

A large number (500,000) of titles cannot be automatically located because the parcel that the title refers to is no longer current and is not mapped in LandOnline. Other reasons are ambiguous appellation that prevents a reliable match so they are not linked by LINZ until they come up for a change of title, not just change of owner.

Titles can have multiple owners, so these have been added as an abbreviated list to each title. Owners can be companies or trusts.

Total number 1.78 million.

Warning:
This set of titles is subject to recall if a protected title is issued in error.

Source LINZ BDE Crown Copyright Reserved

Layer ID 518
Data type Vector point
Feature count 1804783
Services Vector Query API

NZ SeaCoast (poly)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1033
1173
Updated
13 Oct 2011

Seacoast is a combination of the coast AND offshore islands such as Great Barrier Island, Kawau Island, Kapati Island, D'Urville Island and many others.

Does not include offshore islands such as Chatham, Kermadec or Campbell Islands.

This is a polygon featureclass, maybe you want Seacoast_ln formatted as a polyline featureclass if your software cannot handle such complex polygons.

Scale 1:50,000
Source LINZ Topographic dataset

Layer ID 297
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 9309
Services Vector Query API

LINZ maintains a point layer of primary address points allocated by local councils for rateable properties. The principle purpose of this dataset is to allocate voters to the correct electorate. The set is actively maintained, but is still incomplete and some locations are incorrect. Nevertheless it is by far the most comprehensive address database available.

It includes all rural address points (RAPID numbers), commercial addresses and many flat numbers. So numbers are not numeric, there are all sorts of formats included here, sorry. Addresses are not unique. The points are "location addresses", not "postal addresses". For residential town addresses this is normally the same, but for commercial and rural locations they are not the same.

Primary addresses are only the number and alpha parts. Not included is a flat, unit, apartment, floor or other subdivision of the main property address. They should also not be a range, simply the entrance to the property.

Address points only have a number and a key to a road centreline segment. They did not contain a full address or postcode as you see here.

Road names in the address are joined from the road centreline segments, in turn derived from the ASP (Authoritative Streets and Places) database (downloadable from the LINZ site). All road names in this database are official, with a locality (suburb or town) allocated to make the complete address unique within a local council district. There are no postcodes in the ASP of course. Unfortunately there is only one entry linked per road name, which is not always correct for long roads, where the road is a suburb boundary or a road is cut by a TLA boundary. Road names are unique if you include the location and local authority name as part of the name. The postcode alone does not make an address unique because they cover too large an area and NZPost use a different surburb/mailtown/postcode composite key.

These addresses are a "situation" or "location" address, not a "delivery address" or "property identifier". It does not have complete flat or unit numbers, although there are some due to confusion in the purpose of the database, so you will see some.

NZ Post uses this dataset to maintain their GeoPAF file which is a subset of this data because they only supply 'post' addresses where they deliver mail. Therefore no commercial or rural addresses are included in the PAF (PO Boxes are the postal address for these properties). The postcode has been added from an original postcode map, not from the PAF. It is not part of the LINZ or ASP. Postcodes are for bulk mail sorting, not for defining a unique location address. (NZPost will supplement the PAF with all address points for a significant fee.)

Note that an address number is related to the road centreline. No road - no address. It is a linear referencing system, starting at one end, continuing in sequence to the end of the road with odd numbers on one side and even numbers on the other. In towns the spacing is approximately 20 metres, and in the country it is 200 metres.

Addresses are NOT related to parcels and should not be a property key because they are not unique, consider a corner section. They do not define property boundaries. Think of addresses as the location of the letterbox marking the entrance to the property, not the building. The mapped point is generally located 15 metres from the centreline at the entrance or at the neck of a rear section. Address ranges on a point are deprecated in the NZ address standard, a single number should be allocated to the principle entrance so the fire service can find it quickly and unambiguously.

This is different from base address ranges with parity and direction on a road centreline which would be really useful and are common overseas but do not exist for NZ. Even private sets are not done properly. A base address is a simple integer with a range of 1 - 9999.

See [Where The Hell Are You?] ( www.ollivier.co.nz/publication/GITA2005/ollivier_a...) for more explanation on the confusion between an address and a property and the NZ Address Standard AS/NZS 4819:2003.

Source LINZ Bulk Data Extract December 2011, ASP December 2011, Postcodes Nov 2006

Layer ID 910
Data type Vector point
Feature count 1679625
Services Vector Query API

NZTopo50 is the new sheet index for the 1:50,000 series in NZTM being prepared by LINZ for release in September 2009. This series is space filling and complete, unlike the hardcopy planned with some one third overlap sheets at the edges to avoid whole sheets with a tiny piece of land.

Each tile is 24 km x 36 km in a portrait layout designed to fit on a metric A1 page at 1:50,000.

The series also the basis for standard aerial photo tiles, with nested subsets at larger scales 1:25,000, 1:10,000 down to 1:1,000. Each sheet has a standard code eg BC30 with two letters to distinguish it from the NZMS260 series. The order is also corrected, the rows (first part) are now letters and the columns the second number so that the pattern is more intuitive. Larger sheets have an additional numbered grid within the main named sheet. The nested sheets also fit on an A1 page at their design scale.

Some sheets at the edges are now named with the adjacent sheet.

Although the army and scouts like to use the sheet name and short coordinates relative to the sheet corner, really in this modern age you should now always quote full NZTM coordinates for locations because gps units and other displays do not use sheets. even You could also list the sheet that the feature is on with the full coordinates.

Note that the thumbnail is slightly distorted because it is not displayed in New Zealand Transverse Mercator, the new standard for NZ maps. They would otherwise be exactly rectangular.

Names updated to match September 2009 hardcopy names.

Layer ID 415
Data type Vector polygon
Feature count 448
Services Vector Query API

Christchurch / Canterbury Address Points (Feb 2011)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2747
348
Added
27 Feb 2011

Donated by Ollivier & Co for Christchurch post-earthquake efforts.

LINZ maintains a point layer of primary address points allocated by local councils for rateable properties. The principle purpose of this dataset is to allocate voters to the correct electorate. The set is actively maintained, but is still incomplete and some locations are incorrect. Nevertheless it is by far the most comprehensive address database available.

It includes all rural address points (RAPID numbers), commercial addresses and many flat numbers. So numbers are not numeric, there are all sorts of formats included here, sorry. Addresses are not unique. The points are "location addresses", not "postal addresses". For residential town addresses this is normally the same, but for commercial and rural locations they are not the same.

Primary addresses are only the number and alpha parts. Not included is a flat, unit, apartment, floor or other subdivision of the main property address. They should also not be a range, simply the entrance to the property.

Address points only have a number and a key to a road centreline segment. They did not contain a full address or postcode as you see here.

Road names in the address are joined from the road centreline segments, in turn derived from the ASP (Authoritative Streets and Places) database (downloadable from the LINZ site). All road names in this database are official, with a locality (suburb or town) allocated to make the complete address unique within a local council district. There are no postcodes in the ASP of course. Unfortunately there is only one entry linked per road name, which is not always correct for long roads, where the road is a suburb boundary or a road is cut by a TLA boundary. Road names are unique if you include the location and local authority name as part of the name. The postcode alone does not make an address unique because they cover too large an area and NZPost use a different surburb/mailtown/postcode composite key.

These addresses are a "situation" or "location" address, not a "delivery address" or "property identifier". It does not have complete flat or unit numbers, although there are some due to confusion in the purpose of the database, so you will see some.

NZ Post uses this dataset to maintain their GeoPAF file which is a subset of this data because they only supply 'post' addresses where they deliver mail. Therefore no commercial or rural addresses are included in the PAF (PO Boxes are the postal address for these properties). The postcode has been added from an original postcode map, not from the PAF. It is not part of the LINZ or ASP. Postcodes are for bulk mail sorting, not for defining a unique location address. (NZPost will supplement the PAF with all address points for a significant fee.)

Note that an address number is related to the road centreline. No road - no address. It is a linear referencing system, starting at one end, continuing in sequence to the end of the road with odd numbers on one side and even numbers on the other. In towns the spacing is approximately 20 metres, and in the country it is 200 metres.

Addresses are NOT related to parcels and should not be a property key because they are not unique, consider a corner section. They do not define property boundaries. Think of addresses as the location of the letterbox marking the entrance to the property, not the building. The mapped point is generally located 15 metres from the centreline at the entrance or at the neck of a rear section. Address ranges on a point are deprecated in the NZ address standard, a single number should be allocated to the principle entrance so the fire service can find it quickly and unambiguously.

This is different from base address ranges with parity and direction on a road centreline which would be really useful and are common overseas but do not exist for NZ. Even private sets are not done properly. A base address is a simple integer with a range of 1 - 9999.

See [Where The Hell Are You?] ( www.ollivier.co.nz/publication/GITA2005/ollivier_a...) for more explanation on the confusion between an address and a property and the NZ Address Standard AS/NZS 4819:2003.

Source LINZ Bulk Data Extract February 2011, ASP, Postcodes Nov 2006

Layer ID 3162
Data type Vector point
Feature count 179502
Services Vector Query API
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